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Food Scientists refers Browned toast and potatoes are ‘potential cancer risk’

According to Food Standards Agency new research Browned toast and potatoes are ‘potential cancer risk’ as Acrylamide is produced when starchy foods are roasted, fried or grilled for too long at high temperatures.

The Food Standards Agency (FSA) recommends carefully following cooking instructions and avoiding browning.

Bread, chips and potatoes should be cooked to a golden yellow colour, rather than brown, to reduce our intake of a chemical which could cause cancer, government food scientists are warning.

The FSA also says potatoes and parsnips should not be kept in the fridge. This is because sugar levels rise in the vegetables at low temperatures, potentially increasing the amount of acrylamide produced during cooking.

The possible effects of acrylamide exposure include an increased lifetime risk of cancer and effects on the nervous and reproductive systems.

But whether or not acrylamide causes these effects in humans depends upon the level of exposure – and some are not convinced that there is any real danger to public health.

Cancer Research UK says crisps, chips and biscuits are major sources of acrylamide. Smoking exposes people to three to four times more acrylamide than non-smokers because the chemical is present in tobacco smoke. As well as advising the public, the Food Standards Agency is also working with industry to reduce acrylamide in processed food.

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